“Into the Silent Sea” (2013)

By Colleen Rowe

andrej Landin SBFF

(Andrej Landin post-screening of “Into the Silent Sea” at the 19th annual Stony Brook Film Festival, July 2014)

Filmmaker, Andrej Landin’s film, “Into the Silent Sea,” reveals a premise that surpasses the meaning of “short” by its simple definition. Powerfully presented, this 25 minute short taps into the emotions that wither in a man’s heart as he partakes in a journey that might be directly responsible for his emotional and physical demise.

Alexander (Zack Sayenko), a young cosmonaut, is assigned to a mission to space that has not been fully prepared. To beat the Americans, Russia must prevail in space travel and advanced technology. The larger premise revolves around Alexander’s physical and mental journey as he faces complications far away from a civilized world. Andrej Landin had explained during a Q & A at the 19th Annual Stony Brook Film Festival that he had been reading Joseph Conrad’s book, “Heart of Darkness,” and the sense of solitude that invades its pages inspired him to capture that isolation in a different way.

Why is this concept so unique? The setting is relevant to the story, but it isn’t crucial in comparison to the other aspects of this film. It is not the placing of Alexander, but the conversation he has with Italian radio engineer, Alvaro (Peter Arpesella). Alvaro picks up the astronaut’s call for rescue and they seem to become acquaintances that potentially change each other’s lives.

At times, why is it easier to speak with a stranger? The interaction is partially anonymous.

Reliving past experiences with his fellow astronaut and lover, Tanya (Tatiana DeKhtyar), Alexander tells a tale of immediate attraction and unexpected deception. The conversation between these two men via long-distance radio communication technology fills blanks into Alexander’s life and suddenly viewers feel that they experienced it with him.

There’s a retrospective scene that is particularly captivating: as the sun sets, the two young cosmonaut lovers, Alexander and Tanya, walk in a field that is worlds away from the deteriorating space craft Alexander is exiled to. Visually, this scene was necessary, depicting a safe place—a happy time—with the sky’s natural aesthetics to soften the film’s generally dark tone.

There’s a lot to be said about “Into the Silent Sea,” but my first response to those who inquire about it is: just watch it.

Depending on each viewer’s individual experiences with love and loss, this film has the potential to produce uniquely original and differing views. Controversial, challenging, and directed with purpose, this short film achieves in portraying a powerful message: Regardless of the familiar groups we identify with, it is sometimes strangers who save us from all-encompassing inner turmoil.

“Into the Silent Sea” Awards:

San Luis OBISPO International Film festival 2014 Best Student Film, BAFTA Los Angeles Grand Jury Prize 2013, Stony Brook Film Festival Special Jury Recognition 2014, Santa Fe Independent Film Festival Best Narrative Short 2013.

More: Facebook.com/IntoTheSilentSea

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Stony Brook Film Festival Photo Collection

Andrej Landin at Stony Brook Film Festival’s Q & A for his short film: “Into the Silent Sea.” Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014Andrej Landin

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Don Cherel at the Q & A for his short film “Sorta’ Horny”, Tuesday, July 22, 2014

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Film Syrup model & contributor, Paige Skelly with Daphne Rubin-Vega (Smash, RENT [Broadway]) after the showing of “Fall to Rise.”

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Cast members and director, Jayce Bartok during the “Fall to Rise” Q & A. Saturday, July 19th, 2014.

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