She’s Beautiful when She’s Angry

Director Mary Dore’s documentary, She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry, sheds light upon the necessary issues that plagued women during the modern women’s movement. Dore focuses on the years 1966 to 1971 and the anger that influenced women to fight against the typical man-powered society that women were subjected to living in during this time. The coverage of this film is far reaching for a five year span.

Women were agitated at their placement in society and a world that was dominated by males. In one part of the film, bathed in the anger that fell upon them in a tormenting succession of years without power, these women marched the streets saying the type of things that usually men themselves yelled out as they “appreciated” a woman’s body, or rather, catcalled them. During “slut walks” women shed their clothing, women were protesting against the inequality between man and woman.

Mary Dore spoke during a Q & A post-screening of She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry on March 25th, 2014 at the Cinema Arts Centre in Huntington. It was mentioned that a lot of the material and footage used to portray the modern women’s movement in this film would have usually been put into archives and would have eventually been forgotten, if it had not been for Mary Dore. Mary Dore explained that it took a very long time to make this film, because, surprisingly, it’s not a popular subject.

More than 21 years ago, Mary Dore started to write the grants for this film. There were a lot of people within the grants process who didn’t want to help support this film, because “it had already been done before.” The anger Dore felt during this process pushed her to try harder to make the film. Mary Dore wanted to specifically cover the earlier part of the movement, because she felt that it hadn’t been covered enough. She also mentioned that many of the people involved in this movement were also involved in other movements that were going on at the time. Half of the women in this film were involved with the civil rights movement.

Dore also wanted to exemplify the importance of the Child Care Bill, which was something that almost happened during this time period. Stereotypes from that time period are still around and continue to plague us with ignorance that destroys the quality of life for women. Without the women featured in this film and their associates, we would not be at this level of equality. There are plenty of issues within She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry that are relevant today. These women pushed for power where power is deserved. This film encourages viewers to wake up with the inspiring reminiscing memories the interviewees contributed. Take a walk down the street and feel yourself liberated by the work that the women in this film did for the common woman in today’s society. Why stop now?

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Joan Rivers: A Piece of Work

By Colleen Rowe

The 2010 documentary Joan Rivers: A Piece of Work was well produced in comparison to her life-long career struggle with pleasing the critics in the entertainment industry. It’s slightly heartbreaking to watch, especially with the turmoil of Rivers’ anxieties stressing herself thin and making her seem as if she was a woman who could not filter herself. There’s a fine line between anxiety that becomes a part of a persona and carelessly offending people for the sake of comedy.

Throughout the documentary, viewers can see Joan’s self-conscious side erupting between her acts. She was angry that not enough people were coming out to see her, and within the question of a possibly falling career, she seemed to always compare herself to Kathy Griffith. Joan Rivers knew that she was a comedy icon, and she demanded the respect that the entertainment world sometimes didn’t want to give her. Her acts were brash, sometimes condescending, and rude toward the individuals who came out to see her perform. As Rivers put it, “There’s always an adjective before my name and it’s never a nice adjective.”

It isn’t completely clear whether Joan Rivers’ caustic outbursts were completely subconscious, as her daughter, Melissa Rivers, mentions at one point of the documentary. It seems that there was a mixture of both subconscious outbursts and intentional metaphorical slayings, which Joan Rivers used to cut into people maliciously. What was heartbreaking about this documentary was the explanation of Rivers’ life. How she truly wanted to be an actor, but comedy was a niche that she fell into. Joan Rivers, a comedy icon was not only disrespected, but she was also respected for “paving the way” for women in comedy. This paradoxical understanding of Joan is the only understanding that there really is: she was a complicated woman. There’s nothing wrong with perfecting a persona, but the woman who Joan Rivers was when she wasn’t performing or acting was a nervous, caring mother with a lot of heart. Joan Rivers: A Piece of Work shows the business within Joan Rivers and the personal fire within herself that fueled her verbal ammo.

The documentary itself really pulls out these complications and convinces viewers that Joan Rivers was struggling and, as she began to dwindle into an elderly age gap, her career began to suffer. The term “edgy” had taken a different spin in the entertainment world.  Is this documentary worth seeing? With such a complicated comedic force, this is for you to decide on your own.

Joan Rivers: A Piece of Work was shown at the Gold Coast International Film Festival this past November

All American High REVISITED

As the mission statement makes clear, informative sense, explaining that the world before mobile phones and reality television, there was only footage to hold within storages of memory. Cardboard Boxes to be cut and ripped open, to glimpse into the past. The graduating class of 1984 at Torrance High was brilliant, arrogant, decisive, indecisive, unsure, but completely sure of who they wanted to be, or rather, become. In Keva Rosenfield’s All American High REVISITED, these individuals tell their stories.

They open up their worlds with thin wrappings from their minds, what they believe the world should be, become, or if it should stay exactly as it was meant to stay. Their worlds become yours, or perhaps, ours, because our hopes are intertwined in this film. It’s not simply a documentary, but a documentation of what is meant to be great, and falls short sometimes, and by short I mean separate stories; and then, eventually, take the lead. These students take the lead later in their lives, regardless of their shortcomings in earlier times. Life is without a doubt, a hopeless regret, until you wake up one morning and you realize you became exactly who you are meant to be.

The most notable individual within All American High REVISITED is the immigrant student, who seems to understand the world as it has been handed to her seemingly spoiled, arrogant, and sometimes, inspirational classmates. She voices herself like she is not one of the crowd, and to be honest, respect is given to her by an audience rather than her peers. Of course, it seems like she fits right in, at times, but in her own words we find an understanding of who we, as an audience, are and who we blatantly want to become. That’s who they wanted, and that’s who they will always become. It’s what we are, adults who were once teenagers, and who are meant to become, or rather, became.

The power behind this film is the students. They are loving to their football team, their fund-raisers, their hopefulness, their lack of words as they described concepts that seemed so large to themselves, but began to understand once the larger world presented itself before them. Students, with hopes, goals, achievements—some that were plagued by the unity of arrogance, some with enough arrogance to make a difference. But these students learned, quite well, that they would one day become adults who actually live those aspirations and dreams, or perhaps, have the opposite come true. By opposite I mean that their careers are based around their personalities.

The world is most definitely, a scary place, especially inside a classroom. As the students raise their hands high, they are often questioning the world, rightfully and, without meaning to, wrongfully, but it’s their obligation to learn, but life teaches you and me much better. The students are you and I, both, me and you—that’s the focus of this documentary…that high school, no matter how far away, is a place where individuals learn about the world. Once they cross over from being a group of teenagers, and enter the adult world, adults learn about themselves

Let me tell you about myself when I was in High School. I was a loud mouth know-it-all who was enrolled in AP and Honors classes (this honestly made me believe that I was smarter than everyone else even though I wasn’t) who was ignorant in a lot of ways, but I always tried to help the underdog. I was one of the editors of my high school’s literary and arts magazine, Kaleidoscope. I was a new girl who learned to be a part of the crowd, sometimes. I made idiotic comments and talked back to some of my teachers, but I respected more of them than I talked back to. To be completely honest, I haven’t changed too much. In a lot of ways I have, or I did, in recent years, but that’s all a part of growing up. When I was growing up my mother always told me, jokingly, “It’s a conspiracy” because, to be completely honest, I watched too many movies growing up. I’ve found that her sarcasm shaped who I am…because I did take life too seriously. And then I didn’t. And then I did. Sometimes I still act like this, but I tend to joke around a lot more—even when I shouldn’t be—because it’s important to be able to laugh at yourself. To cry when you have to. In this film, I saw a lot of the things that I had seen growing up.

All American High REVISITED is a brilliant understanding of the humans and their kindness. The world is destructively real in many ways. In high school it’s a time to figure out how the world works before you’re set off onto a mission for intelligence and learning expressions through meeting new souls and their remaining helpfulness. But, it’s always important to be wise with your decisions when meeting certain folks. It’s worth a second, maybe a third, most definitely a fourth watch—for it is great.